This is a blog about the Belle Époque in Europe, which lasted from 1871 until 1914, when the first world war began. Occurring during the era of the Third French Republic (beginning 1870), it was a period characterized by optimism, peace at home and in Europe, new technology and scientific discoveries. The peace and prosperity in Paris allowed the arts to flourish, and many masterpieces of literature, music, theater, and visual art gained recognition. The Belle Époque was named, in retrospect, when it began to be considered a "golden age" in contrast to the horrors of World War I.

 

bulletproofjewels:

Franz Xaver Winterhalter’s paintings of Empress Eugénie of France, the ultimate beauty of her era.


A Musician & His Daughter
Thomas de Keyser
1629
In this dynamic formal portrait an amateur musician with a theorbo is presented with his daughter in a spare but stylish interior. Both are expensively dressed, the girl in adult attire. Other portraits of the period make it clear that the man may be married and have other children: such a portrait of parent and child has teaching or, at least, setting an example as its theme. The steep perspective and, as a result, the seemingly awkward pose of the man (he is sitting, not rising) are typical of De Keyser, who until Rembrandt arrived in the early 1630s was the most prominent portrait painter in Amsterdam.
MET

A Musician & His Daughter

Thomas de Keyser

1629

In this dynamic formal portrait an amateur musician with a theorbo is presented with his daughter in a spare but stylish interior. Both are expensively dressed, the girl in adult attire. Other portraits of the period make it clear that the man may be married and have other children: such a portrait of parent and child has teaching or, at least, setting an example as its theme. The steep perspective and, as a result, the seemingly awkward pose of the man (he is sitting, not rising) are typical of De Keyser, who until Rembrandt arrived in the early 1630s was the most prominent portrait painter in Amsterdam.

MET

an-instrumental-heart:

I have heard quite a few people say that it is “unacceptable” to compare the the Israeli movement (and the political parties) that are advocating for the massacres in Gaza to how Nazism created Holocaust. Well, here you have some of the reasons why I think the comparison not only is a good one - but also necessary. All these articles have been written during or in the days/weeks before the war in Gaza began.

Certainly, Holocaust was a huge historical event and not many historical events have been bigger than it (although people need to remember that both Stalin and Mao killed more people than Hitler ever did). And somehow, Holocaust’s status prevents people from doing comparisons between Holocaust and other genocides/wars/conflicts in the world. And true, Holocaust was an extreme genocide, even among genocides. Still, when even Israeli politicians and journalist(s) are saying that Gaza might be facing a Holocaust (and even advocates for a genocide), I think it is necessary to make such a shocking comparison. Israel needs to understand that they can’t keep on reducing Gaza to rubble and then blame Hamas for everything. Israel needs to understand that even though the Jews suffered during Holocaust, they are not entitled to reproduce Holocaust (or anything like it).

More and more people are standing up against what Israel is doing to the Palestinians. And before the war turns into yet an other genocide, I think we all have the moral obligation to do whatever we can to prevent it from happening. Even if that means making shocking comparisons between the past and the present.

the-garden-of-delights:

"The Royal Family at Buckingham Palace" (1913) by Sir John Lavery (1856-1941).

the-garden-of-delights:

"The Royal Family at Buckingham Palace" (1913) by Sir John Lavery (1856-1941).